Milan J. Michalec elected President of the Cow Creek GCD

CCGCD installs new director; reassigns board positions May 29, 2014 By Carline Schwartz, News Editor, The Boerne Star Three Cow Creek Groundwater Conservation District directors were officially sworn in by Kendall County Clerk Darlene Herrin during a regular meeting Tuesday, May 13. Current directors Don Dietzmann and Bob Webster and new director Curt Campbell, who replaced outgoing president Tommy Mathews, all ran unopposed and were declared elected in March after the district canceled its May 10 election.  During the meeting,…

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Award-winning rainwater capture system crowning achievement of retiring Bandera High teacher

Congratulations to Brad Flink, who’s RWH project was honored by the Texas Water Development Board with its Texas Rain Catcher Award. HCA’s Rainwater Revival grant program provided support to document this project and create a model for other campuses. The stormwater retention and reuse system created by students is capable of holding 84,000 gallons for irrigating the Bulldogs’ baseball field. Read more from Zeke MacCormak and the SA Express News.

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Meet Andrew Murr

Andrew Murr will face a Libertarian challenger in November to represent District 53 in the Texas House of Representatives. This District includes Bandera, Crockett, Edwards, Kerr, Kimble, Llano, Mason, Medina, Menard, Real, Schleicher, Sutton counties. Texas House of Representative, House District 53   Texas is in his blood Texas is in Andrew Murr’s blood – an 8th generation Texan, descendant of a pioneering family of one of our brave defenders of the Alamo, and grandson of former Governor Coke R.…

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Managers Discuss Hill Country’s Water Resources and the Drought

Livestock Weekly May 22, 2014 By Colleen Schreiber SAN ANTONIO – The Trinity Aquifer and the Upper Guadalupe River are major components of the hill country’s available water supply. While these water resources typically do not receive as much attention as the more prominent Edwards Aquifer, for example, with the rapidly growing population in this part of the state their importance has never been more crucial. Ray Buck has served as the general manager for the Upper Guadalupe River Authority…

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Thinking about becoming a Master Naturalist?

The Hill Country Master Naturalists are now recruiting for their Fall Class. With a mission to “develop a corps of well-informed volunteers to provide education, outreach, and service dedicated to the beneficial management of natural resources and natural areas within their communities.” HCMN works in Bandera, Gillespie, Kendall, Kerr, Edwards, Real, Kimble, Mason and Menard Counties. Learn more about how to apply. There are several other Master Naturalist programs in the Hill Country. Find a chapter near you.

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EPA Releases EnviroAtlas Ecosystem Mapping Tool

May 27, 2014 WASHINGTON – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today released EnviroAtlas, a web-based interactive tool that integrates over 300 separate data layers, helps decision makers understand the implications of planning and policy decisions on our fragile ecosystems and the communities who depend on goods and services from these ecosystems. EnviroAtlas is designed for people from all levels of government, professionals, researchers, educators, non-governmental organizations, and anyone interested in considering the benefits or impacts of a decision, such…

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Lawn alternatives gain popularity but ‘carpet grass’ remains norm

By Elena Tucker, Features Writer The Boerne Star Part one of a two-part series At a glance, Boerne shows up as an emerald dot on a NASA map of lawns. The area’s cultivated green St. Augustine or “carpet” grass also figures as a fraction of Duke University data in which 40.5 million acres are said to be covered by lawns across the nation. That’s at a cost of $30 billion annually to grounds owners and homeowners who put more than…

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Support for Low Impact Development

May 27, 2014 Central Texas Land/Water Sustainability Forum. No one doubts that conventional land development impacts our creeks and lakes. Urban land development with buildings, roads, and other impervious surfaces allow less rain to soak into the ground, so the volume of runoff increases while base flow in creeks decreases. Also, urban land uses frequently incorporate rapid drainage of stormwater, and this efficient drainage can contribute to a higher peak flow downstream from a developed site. The problems produced by…

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Western Hill Country Ranch honored by TPWD

Congratulations to Ruthie and Johnnie Russell for being recognized by TPWD as a Lone Star Land Steward. The Russell’s chose to enact a conservation easement on their property because of growing pressure of land fragmentation. “Ranchettes make it difficult to conserve land on the scale necessary to keep habitat intact and ecological systems functioning” Ruthie said. Read more from the Texas Agricultural Land Trust and enjoy a great video about the Sycamore Ranch here.

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