Rainwater Revival Agenda Now Set: Speakers to Bring Messages of Free, Easy, Dependable Water

Rainwater Revival Agenda Now Set: Speakers to Bring Messages of Free, Easy, Dependable Water

  • October 31, 2016
  • News

The annual Rainwater Revival is the largest gathering of rainwater harvesting businesses and contractors in the state. Now in its 7th year, the Revival continues to evangelize the message of delicious water that comes free from the sky and is so easy to capture, store and use for home or garden. The Rainwater Revival, ever popular with homeowners and businesses alike, is free, family-friendly and set for Saturday, November 5, 10am to 4pm at the Dripping Springs Ranch Park. The…

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Hays County voters have big choice on $237.8 million bond package

Hays County voters have big choice on $237.8 million bond package

  • October 30, 2016
  • News

Hays County voters will have to make a choice at the polls this year on the county’s largest request since 2008: a $237.8 million bond package. The bond package has two propositions: $106.4 million for public safety facilities, including an expansion and renovation of the decades-old jail and construction of buildings for emergency communications and law enforcement, and $131.4 million for road construction. Officials in Hays County, one of the fastest-growing counties in the country, say these measures are necessary…

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In the Growing Battle Against Invasive Plants, Texas Lags Behind Other States

In the Growing Battle Against Invasive Plants, Texas Lags Behind Other States

  • October 29, 2016
  • News

“One of the great ironies of battling invasive plants is that many of them are legal to buy and plant in Texas. The City of Austin is one the few cities in the country that keeps a list of locally invasive plants that it works to control. It includes the plants glossy privet and elephant ear. “That’s another one that we’re working to replace with native vegetation, and that’s principally by manual means,” said John Clement with the Austin Watershed Protection Department. “We have crews…

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The Source: Garney Failure Could Mean SAWS Takeover Of Vista Ridge Project

In a turn-about San Antonio Water System CEO Robert Puente said the water utility would take over the construction of the Vista Ridge Water Pipeline if Garney was unable to meet certain deadlines. In May, after the Spanish conglomerate Abengoa went bankrupt, the Kansas City-based firm Garney Construction took over the building of the 142-mile water pipeline known as Vista Ridge. The $3 billion project calls for water to start flowing from Burleson County by the year 2020. Speaking on…

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Video: Monarchs: The Milkweed Mission (9:01)

Video: Monarchs: The Milkweed Mission (9:01)

  • October 24, 2016
  • News

From their winter home in Mexico and north along their amazing annual migration, Monarch butterflies are threatened by deforestation, climate change and drought and agriculture policies. The Nobelity Project’s Turk Pipkin looks at the wonder of the monarchs and what can be done to save the migration. Learn more at monarchconservation.org Learn about The Nobelity Project’s work for education and a sustainable world at nobelity.org Monarchs: The Milkweed Mission from The Nobelity Project on Vimeo.

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California Law Recognizes Meadows and Forests as Water Infrastructure

California Law Recognizes Meadows and Forests as Water Infrastructure

  • October 24, 2016
  • News

California’s vast water infrastructure is likely the most extensive in the world. It includes the tallest dam in the nation and enormous state and federal water projects that tap rivers flowing from as far away as Wyoming. On September 27th, Governor Brown signed legislation that recognizes the state’s watersheds as part of it’s infrastructure. Just as the state’s canals and levees need maintenance and repair, so do our rivers and watersheds. This bill opens the door to using modern infrastructure…

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It Takes a Network to Tackle Growth and Complexity

It Takes a Network to Tackle Growth and Complexity

  • October 18, 2016
  • News

Famous frontiersman and politician Davy Crockett once remarked, “You may all go to Hell and I will go to Texas,” and apparently, he was onto something. While the impetus for his remark was disenchantment with Tennessee politics in the early 1830s, an increasingly large number of people have followed in his footsteps. According to a recent Census Bureau report, Texas is home to several of the fastest-growing cities in the nation, with much of that growth occurring in a unique…

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America’s Next Great Metropolis Is Taking Shape In Texas

America’s Next Great Metropolis Is Taking Shape In Texas

  • October 18, 2016
  • News

If you drive south from Dallas, or west from Houston, a subtle shift takes place. The monotonous, flat prairie that dominates much of Texas gives way to a landscape that rises and ebbs. The region around Highway 35 is called the Hill Country, and although it does not seem so curvy to a Californian, it is some of the very nicest country in the state of Texas, attracting a growing coterie of wealthy boomers. It also turns out to be a growth corridor…

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West Travis County construction hammers may stop

West Travis County construction hammers may stop

  • October 18, 2016
  • News

 Officials of the West Travis County Public Utility Agency, which services Bee Cave, Travis County Municipal Utility District No. 5 and parts of Hays County with water and wastewater, said it has exceeded, at least on paper, its service capacity. “We are oversubscribed from a paper commitment standpoint,” District Engineer Curtis Wilson told WTCPUA directors during the agency’s Sept. 15 meeting in Bee Cave. Once a developer seeks to create a project, he or she files a service extension request,…

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What the Prairie Teaches Us

What the Prairie Teaches Us

Paul Gruchow | The prairie, although plain, inspires awe.  It teaches us that grandeur can be wide as well as tall. Young prairie plants put down deep roots first; only when these have been established do the plants invest much energy in growth above ground.  They teach us that the work that matters doesn’t always show. Diversity makes the prairie resilient.  One hundred acres of prairie may support three thousand species of insects alone, each of them poised to exploit…

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