With Texas Building Boom Comes Higher Flood Risk

With Texas Building Boom Comes Higher Flood Risk

  • November 30, 2016
  • News

Over the years, planners, engineers, water quality experts and others have come to recognize how urban development can drastically alter the landscape and exacerbate flooding. The culprit, many experts believe, is impervious cover — the massive buildings, commercial strips and houses in addition to the asphalt and concrete that we walk and drive on every day. By stopping rain from absorbing into the ground, impervious cover increases the volume and speed of runoff from heavy downpours, pushing it in different…

Read More
Director’s Notes – November 2016

Director’s Notes – November 2016

  • November 16, 2016
  • News

November 2016: Giving Thanks – Just like that, Fall is in full swing in the Hill Country and the gorgeous cooler weather reminds us the holidays will soon be here. November is a month for giving thanks, and I appreciate the opportunity to share with all of you a few of the incredible things I am grateful for this year. Passionate, hardworking staff. The work of the Hill Country Alliance was recently summarized by the editor of the Fredericksburg Standard…

Read More
How Urban Trees Can Save Lives

How Urban Trees Can Save Lives

  • November 15, 2016
  • News

Heatwaves are one of the world’s most underestimated threats, killing more than 12,000 people every year around the world—more than any other weather-related event. And heat is especially dangerous in cities, which tend to be much warmer than surrounding less-developed areas. On top of that, cities tend to have higher levels of air pollution, which contribute to more than 3 million deaths every year. With 70 percent of the world’s population predicted to live in cities by 2050, heat and…

Read More
85th Texas Legislature – Committees discuss water issues as they prepare for next session

85th Texas Legislature – Committees discuss water issues as they prepare for next session

Are you curious what water topics will be discussed, debated and voted on during the upcoming 85th Texas legislative session? While it is still early, the following information will help you stay current on legislative activities. In between sessions, interim charges are issued to both House and Senate legislative committees. The committees hold meetings during the interim, hearing testimony and receiving written testimony about the issues the committees are studying. Before the session begins, each committee will issue a report…

Read More
Dripping Springs residents oppose Onion Creek wastewater discharge

Dripping Springs residents oppose Onion Creek wastewater discharge

  • November 14, 2016
  • News

The city of Dripping Springs and Texas Commission on Environmental Quality listened to dozens of north Hays County residents and community members speak against a proposed permit that could allow the city to discharge up to 955,000 gallons of wastewater into Onion Creek every day. City officials said Dripping Springs does not plan to discharge anywhere near that amount of water in the near future, and the city’s intent from the beginning of the application process—which began in 2014—has been to…

Read More
Dripping Springs residents upset over treated sewage dumping in Onion Creek

Dripping Springs residents upset over treated sewage dumping in Onion Creek

Treated sewage is being dumped into the Onion Creek Central Texas waterway as the area works to keep up with the all the people moving to Hays County. The tributary begins on the Blanco/Hays county line and snakes its way to the Colorado River in Austin. Along the way water flows into Barton Creek and then Barton Springs in Austin. But it is in Dripping Springs where there battle is taking place. Passing south of town, the city has filed…

Read More
Online Survey Seeks to Understand Private Land Management Needs

Online Survey Seeks to Understand Private Land Management Needs

  • November 11, 2016
  • News

TPWD Urging Private Landowners to Participate in Brief Questionnaire | Understanding Texas private landowner needs, preferences and concerns in operating and managing their land and natural resources is the purpose of a brief online questionnaire developed by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) Private Lands Advisory Committee in partnership with Texas A&M University Institute of Renewable Natural Resources. The electronic survey is available now through Dec. 20, takes about 10-15 minutes to complete and is accessible at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/BNPNBXR .…

Read More
With $237.8 million Hays County bond package approved, planning begins

With $237.8 million Hays County bond package approved, planning begins

  • November 11, 2016
  • News

Hays County voters passed a $237.8 million bond package this week, but it may be at least another six months until ground is broken, County Commissioner Will Conley said Wednesday. The bond package included two propositions: $106.4 million for public safety facilities, including an expansion and renovation of the decades-old jail and the construction of buildings for emergency communications and law enforcement, and $131.4 million for road construction. About 51 percent of votes, or 32,242 votes, cast were in favor…

Read More
Special Use Valuation in Texas – The Basics

Special Use Valuation in Texas – The Basics

Most Texas landowners are aware of the special use valuation methods available to agricultural landowners that allow property taxes to be calculated based on productive agricultural value, as opposed to market value of the land.  Importantly, this is not a “tax exemption,” for agricultural landowners, but instead is an alternative way to calculate property taxes owed. Blog series by Texas A&M AgriLife Extension addresses the basic concept of special use valuation, and will then walk through the three valuation methods…

Read More
Oil and gas drilling brightening the dark skies near McDonald Observatory

Oil and gas drilling brightening the dark skies near McDonald Observatory

  • November 7, 2016
  • News

After a career as a stevedore in Florida, amateur astronomer James Lowrey retired 11 years ago to the Big Bend, drawn by the otherworldly viewing possibilities of its inky night skies. But Lowrey and other astronomers in the region fear that lights from flares and oil rigs in the ever-expanding Permian Basin oil boom to the north may soon endanger their precious dark skies. In late October, Lowrey filed six complaints in Reeves County, claiming Apache Corp. is violating the…

Read More
  • 1
  • 2