Unpublished Federal Report Projects Bleak Future for Central Texas Mussels and Rivers

Unpublished Federal Report Projects Bleak Future for Central Texas Mussels and Rivers

If the state’s population continues to balloon and climate change worsens, four Central Texas mussels could face near-certain extinction, according to an internal analysis by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) obtained by the Observer. While mussels aren’t exactly the rock stars of the animal world, they play an important role in riverine ecology and water quality: Bivalves siphon off contaminants in water and are widely recognized as a measure of ecological health. To survive, they require a steady and adequate flow…

Read More
Gravel quarries, Kerr mining still a hot issue

Gravel quarries, Kerr mining still a hot issue

Kerr County Commissioner Tom Moser hosted a multi-agency “Town Hall” meeting last week on one of the county’s hot-button issues – the area’s gravel-mining quarries and their regulation and effects on residents. Moser and County Judge Tom Pollard opened the meeting in half of the Event Hall at the Hill Country Youth Event Center, to a full house and a lengthy list of participants. Moser gave participants five minutes to present their current situations and plans, except for TCEQ which…

Read More
In Memoriam: A ‘Force of Nature,’ James Avery Took Texas Jewelry Business National

In Memoriam: A ‘Force of Nature,’ James Avery Took Texas Jewelry Business National

His studio was a two-car garage tucked into the Texas Hill Country, his techniques learned from a library book, and his designs inspired by a hard-won faith. From that humble start, James Avery created a signature jewelry line long recognizable for its handcrafted quality and now known throughout the United States. Avery died Monday, April 30 at the age of 96. The company that bears his name, James Avery Artisan Jewelry, announced his passing and stated that the enterprise’s success is a…

Read More
Travis County implements reclaimed water program to save water and tax dollars

Travis County implements reclaimed water program to save water and tax dollars

Travis County is set to save an estimated 10 million gallons of water per year and also help save thousands of dollars in taxpayer money with its reclaimed water plan for cooling. During a press conference Tuesday, Commissioner Brigid Shea, whose district represents the most urban portion of the county, said the city of Austin extended a purple pipe of treated wastewater, or reclaimed water, along 11th street in downtown Austin as part of the plan. “Most people don’t realize…

Read More