tws_logo091707_225

Thank You for supporting TEN YEARS of Texas’s longest running water oriented lecture series, and the only  Radio Programming dedicated to discussions on water resources!!

Water, essential for life, is our most precious and valuable natural resource. But water supply is limited and under increasing pressure from a growing population. How will we protect this resource and plan for a sustainable future? There is a great need for a water-literate public; decisions being made today have far reaching and long lasting effects for our children and future generations.

For ten years, the Texas Water Symposium Series has provided perspectives from policy makers, scientists, water resource experts and regional leaders. Join us as we continue our exploration of the complex issues and challenges of providing water for Texans in this century. Each session is free and open to the public. Each hour-long program begins at 7:00 pm, followed by discussion time with Q&A. The events are recorded and aired on Texas Public Radio one week later.

Texas Water Symposium Series is a partnership program of Texas Tech University, Schreiner University, Texas Public Radio, and the Hill Country Alliance.

Subscribe for updates on future events  |  Learn about past Symposia  |  Listen to past Symposia from TPR


 

Upcoming Fall 2018 Symposia:

Thursday November 8th 2018 in Kerrville ~

Treated Sewage and Hill Country Streams: Balancing Population Growth and Healthy Rivers

Moderator:
Anne Rogers Harrison — Water Quality Program Leader, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department

Panelists:
Nathan Pence – Executive Manager of Environmental Science and Community Affairs, Guadalupe Blanco River Authority
Sky LeweyResource Protection and Education Director, Nueces River Authority
Chris Herrington PE — Interim Environmental Officer, City of Austin Watershed Protection

Across the Hill Country, we are seeing a proliferation of permit applications to discharge treated wastewater directly into Hill Country creeks and rivers. Population increases are putting pressure on utilities to expand services, and many do not have the technical or financial resources to explore alternatives.

Join Schreiner University, Texas Public Radio, and the Hill Country Alliance for an exploration of how can we accommodate the coming population pressures while protecting our iconic crystal clear rivers and streams? What tools can we use to harness treated effluent’s rich nutrient loads to benefit our landscape without spoiling our waterways?

Download Flyer Here


Thursday November 15th 2018 in San Marcos ~

The Future of Flooding in Texas: How do we protect life and property in the face of extreme weather events?

Moderator:
Bob Rivard — Editor and Publisher of the Rivard Report

Panelists:
Mindy Conyers PhD — State Flood Assessment Coordinator at Texas Water Development Board
Stephen T. Graham, P.E., CFM — Assistant General Manager of San Antonio River Authority
Raymond Slade — Certified Hydrologist, United States Geological Service, Retired
Michael A. Moya, PE, CFM — Water Resources Practice Leader, Halff Associates

Hurricane Harvey, the Blanco River flood of 2015, and other flooding events across the state over the past several years have caused tragic loss of life and immense property damage. As communities rebuild, questions about how we ensure the safety of all Texans remain.

Hydrologists and engineers are rethinking our traditional solutions to rising flood waters.  Local governments are taking a hard look at infrastructure deficiencies and methods for moving or elevating homes out of the floodplain. The Legislature has directed resources to studying the future impact and mitigation of flooding in Texas.

And yet, Texas does not have a statewide plan for flood mitigation or management. There is growing consensus that flooding in our state is increasing in both frequency and severity. Growth patterns have put large segments of our populations directly in the path of flood waters. How can we ensure that the built environment protects against flooding, rather than increase the severity of flooding?

Join us as we explore ways to prevent future flooding event from turning into a human tragedy.

See Flyer Here Soon


 

Previous Symposia from the 2017 – 2018 season

Wednesday May 30, 2018 in Fredericksburg ~

What is “One Water” and can it meet the future water needs of a growing Hill Country?

Moderator:
Jennifer Walker – Senior Program Manager, Texas Living Waters Project

Panelists:
Clinton Bailey P.E. – Assistant City Manager / Director of Public Works & Utilities City of Fredericksburg
Susan Parten P.E. – Principal, Community Environmental Services, Inc.
Laura Talley – Director, Planning and Community Development – City of Boerne
Jennifer Walker – Senior Program Manager, Texas Living Waters Project
Tim Proctor – Manager, Laney Development

Doors open at 6:30
Program 7:00 – 8:30 pm
Hill Country University Center – Fredericksburg
2818 US-290 Fredericksburg, Tx. 78624
Download Flyer

 

 

Thursday May 10, 2018 in Junction

Ecosystem Services: How We Can Help Preserve and Protect Our Natural Assets

Moderator: Katherine Romans, Executive Director, Hill Country Alliance

Panelists:
Rep. Andrew Murr, State Representative District 53
Hughes Simpson, Program Leader, Texas A&M Forest Service
Tom Arsuffi Ph.D., Director of the Llano River Field Station at Texas Tech University

Doors open at 6:30
Program 7:00 – 8:30 pm
Texas Tech Field Station – Junction
254 Red Raider Ln.  Junction, Tx. 76849
Download Flyer


Thursday December 7, 2017 in Boerne ~

Rainwater Harvesting: Innovative Uses and Water Security

Introduction and Comments: Rep. Kyle Biedermann, State Representative District 73

Moderator: Texas Public Radio’s “Organic” Bob Webster

Panelists:
Rep. Jason Isaac, State Representative District 21
John Kight, Kendall County rainwater advocate
Ana Gonzalez PhD., Environmental Scientist, City of Austin Watershed Protection Department
Troy Dorman PhD. P.E., Water Engineer, Tetra Tech Engineering

Doors open at 6:30
Program 7:00 – 8:30 pm
Historic Kendall County Courthouse – Upstairs Courtroom
201 E San Antonio Ave, Boerne, TX 78006 (Map)
Download Flyer

Declining aquifer levels and the rapidly rising cost of water supply and management has prompted suppliers, builders, and homeowners across the region to turn to alternative sources of water. As we look to a long-term future of increasing population growth and demand on groundwater resources, how can individuals, businesses, and cities create sustainable water supply in innovative ways? How can we incentivize water independence and conservation?

Increasingly, these stakeholders are turning to rainwater as a viable source of water for landscape irrigation, in-home and commercial uses. Cities are now utilizing rainwater harvesting as an innovative stormwater management strategy. Texas, and the Hill Country, is known as a region of rainwater harvesting innovation nationwide.

Sponsored by Harvest Rain Rainwater Collection Systems

Thanks to all who braved the remarkable winter snowstorm and attended this Boerne event !


Thursday November 9, 2017 in Kerrville ~

Climate and Water in Central Texas: Planning for a Changing Resource

Moderator: Weir LaBatt, Former Director of the Texas Water Development Board

Panelists:
Dr. John Nielsen-Gammon, Texas State Climatologist and Regents Professor at Texas A&M
John Zeitler, Science & Operations Officer, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
Suzanne Scott, GM, San Antonio River Authority; Chairperson, Region L Water Planning Group and Guadalupe-San Antonio Basin and Bay Stakeholder Committee
Bill Neiman, Founder, Native American Seed Farm, Junction

Our rapidly expanding population coupled with more extreme flooding events and drought cycles is creating short-term management challenges and long-term planning uncertainty. We rely on prevailing climate patterns to plan for development, agriculture, and ranching, but those patterns are changing.

At Native American Seed near Junction, farm manager Bill Neiman notes that On the Llano River, we are experiencing less regularity in the timing of our seasons, the rains, and traditional temperatures.  Investment in successful crops has always been risky, and our changing climate has made it even riskier.”

In order to maintain economic stability, communities across the state need to be able to use and interpret the climate modeling tools we have to predict future weather patterns that inform our management and planning processes.

Join Texas Tech University, Texas Public Radio, Schreiner University and the Hill Country Alliance as we gather diverse perspectives on the challenges of invasive species in Texas – and the future of Texas water resources.

Listen to the program here.

The Texas Water Symposium is free and open to the public.


Texas Water Symposium event archive