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Photo: Wanda Carole Wrinkle Ford

Wildlife

The Hill Country is an incredibly ecologically diverse landscape that is home to native species found nowhere else in the world. Land stewardship, protection of open space and thriving populations of wildlife go hand-in-hand — healthy populations of native wildlife demonstrate that your land is part of a functioning ecosystem. Documents and links on this page provide information on native Hill Country wildlife species and managing land for wildlife.

Wildlife News

Will the song of a single bird delay an Austin highway?

The song of a single endangered bird, detected by Austin biologists in April, could spell a years-long delay for a major Southwest Austin highway project. The builders of the proposed Texas 45 Southwest had reported as recently as last year that no golden-cheeked warblers were to be found along the toll road’s would-be path. But the…

New Native Pollinator Management Guidelines Available for Landowners Working to Achieve Wildlife Tax Valuation

Protecting native insect pollinators on private property now comes with new benefits for landowners. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department’s Nongame and Rare Species Program developed new guidelines for landowners to develop wildlife management plans for their properties. If a landowner’s property is currently evaluated under an Agricultural Tax Valuation, they may qualify for an Agricultural…

Golden-cheeked Warblers return to the Hill Country

Golden-cheeked Warblers (GCWA) are beginning to arrive within their Hill Country haunts. Many more of these birds will arrive over the next couple of weeks. The Golden-cheeked’s scientific name, Setophaga chrysoparia, translates to golden cheek moth eater; moth eater describing the genus which now includes most New World warblers. This federally endangered songbird is an attractive member…

Warbler Science Matters

“The golden-cheeked warbler already has an uncertain future as more and more land is developed in the Hill Country,” said Joan Marshall, director of Texas Audubon. “That’s why the science is so important — to base listing decisions on the best science available. That’s what’s frustrating about Texas A&M’s suppression of the O’Donnell article.” Read the…