Common Misperceptions Regarding Land and Wildlife Management in Central Texas

  • April 21, 2014
  • News

The statements below in Bold are common misperceptions followed by a brief explanation of clarification. Mesquite is not native to Texas; it invaded from Mexico. Mesquite is a native tree and has been here for thousands of years. The density of mesquite has increased on many areas for a variety of reasons. Cedar (juniper) is not native to Texas; it is an invader. Ashe juniper (cedar) is native to the region and was present in very large amounts in the…

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Amazing rally for Bracken Bat Cave

  • April 14, 2014
  • News

Bat Conservation International has inspired major support to prevent intense development of 1500 acres adjacent to Bracken Cave from the City of San Antonio, Mayor Julian Castro, City Councilman Ron Nirenberg, The Kronkosky Charitable Foundation and others. Find out more about recent negotiations to save the cave and learn about upcoming opportunities to personally visit Bracken Bat Cave and see the bats take flight.

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The Great Grassland Myth of the Texas Hill Country

How many times have you heard that the Hill Country was once a great vast grassland with only a modest covering of trees and brush? Although this longstanding myth is deeply ingrained and embraced by many government agencies, biologists, landowners and professionals, it is false and misleading. Learn what the Hill Country was really like prior to 1860 from eye-witness accounts, and why it is important to understand the past. Read and share from Steve Nelle.

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Georgetown moves to limit residential lawns and landscaping to save water

“The rules require residential developers to use only drought-resistant plants from a list provided by the city. St. Augustine grass, which tends to be very thirsty, can only be planted in areas where there is 10 inches of topsoil and less than 6 hours of full sunlight per day.” Read more from the American Statesman (subscription required). Learn more about St. Augustine and the impact lawn watering has on our regional water supply from Native American Seed here. KXAN reports…

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Bennett Trust Land Stewardship educational program set April 23-25 in Kerrville

  By: Kay Ledbetter AgriLife Today State photographer Wyman Meinzer has been selected as the keynote speaker for the Bennett Trust Land Stewardship educational program, “Protecting the Legacy of the Edwards Plateau,” to be hosted by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service April 23-25 in Kerrville. “You do not want to miss this unique opportunity to hear the state photographer of Texas relate the history and legacy of the Edwards Plateau in a pictorial fashion unlike any other,” said Dr.…

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Farm Bill Update: The Agriculture Act of 2014 and Conservation

With the enactment of the Agriculture Act of 2014, known to most of us as the Farm Bill, landowners have more certainty about the availability of federal funds for conservation on farm and ranch lands. The Farm Bill provides up to $57 billion dollars over the next five years to support a variety of rural land conservation activities, including the dedication of conservation easements, and eliminates some of the complexity of the varied conservation programs.Read more from Braun & Gresham.

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House Approves Farm Bill

In a striking show of bi-partisanship, the House of Representatives overwhelmingly voted to support the 2014 Farm Bill. The final vote was 251 – 166. The legislation will generate more than one billion dollars for saving endangered farm and ranch lands. The bill is expected to be approved by the Senate and signed by the President shortly. More from Land Trust Alliance.

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Farm Transfer Tools: Promoting Sustainable Practices

“Many landowners, whether retiring from a lifelong career of farming or inheriting land from parents who farmed, want to leave a legacy of conservation and sustainable agriculture. As a landowner, you may be looking for ways to pass on the farm to a farmer and/or new owner who shares this vision. For retiring farmers and off-farm landowners alike, there are many ways to do this, depending on the value and priorities of the particular landowner.” An excellent resource from NCAT.

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