Central Texas Drought Is Worst on Record

Competition for water prompts a quest for new sources. “The rule of capture is coming to the forefront again,” Venessa Puig-Williams explained. “People in Hays County are seeing that, though the rule purports to uphold property rights, it doesn’t really protect them. Large-scale pumping could dry up nearby groundwater sources.” Read more from Circle of Blue.

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Drought conditions worsen along Highland Lakes

Lower Colorado River Authority AUSTIN, Texas – Preliminary 2014 data shows the drought gripping the Highland Lakes is now the most severe drought the region has experienced since construction of the lakes began in the 1930s. As a direct result of the prolonged record-dry conditions and record-low inflows from the streams and tributaries feeding the Highland Lakes, the “firm yield,” or inventory of water LCRA can provide reliably every year, has been decreased by about 100,000 acre-feet, to 500,000 acre-feet…

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TWDB encourages all of us to learn about drought

TWDB unveils new tools for observing drought data and trends. “We wanted Texans and all those interested in our state’s drought resources to not only see the information we use when evaluating drought in Texas, but also understand why and how we use it,” explained Robert Mace. This data is easy to access whether you are doing technical research or simply trying to understand “Drought in your backyard.” More from TWDB.

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LCRA releases drought update

The LCRA’s drought update for the Highland Lakes region is full of interesting- and disappointing – facts. Due to the rainfall in the Colorado watershed coming in dispersed events and generating little runoff, 2014 inflows into the Highland Lakes system were the second lowest on record. In fact, 7 of the 10 lowest inflow years on record have happened since 2006. If the combined storage of the Highland Lakes fall to below 600,000 acre feet, the LCRA board would be…

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How Underground Sensors in Texas Will Help NASA Predict Drought and Floods

Stanley Rabke’s family has lived and worked on their Hill Country ranch since 1889. Generations of Rabkes have struggled with the extremes of Texas weather, but one storm sticks out in Stanley’s memory: it came after the drought of the 1950s. Learn about the Bureau of Economic Geology research the Rabke’s are participating in. Read the full story from Mose Buchele at State Impact.

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