A milestone in Edwards recharge protection

A milestone in Edwards recharge protection

Thursday, the San Antonio City Council considers purchase of a conservation easement on the 2,800-acre Middle Verde Ranch in Medina County. If approved, this will effectively mark the final expenditure from the $90 million Edwards Aquifer Protection Program fund ratified by voters in 2010. That was the third of four ballot measures dedicating a portion of city sales tax revenue to conserving parcels over the aquifer’s recharge and contributing zones. Voters approved $45 million in 2000, $90 million in 2005,…

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Texas Water Symposium – Audio Streaming Available: Watershed Protection Programs in Texas

Texas Water Symposium – Audio Streaming Available: Watershed Protection Programs in Texas

  • March 8, 2017
  • News

The audio recording of the most recent Texas Water Symposium is now available on Texas Public Radio’s website, www.tpr.org. Experts in watershed protection planning convened on Thursday, February 24th at Texas State University in San Marcos to discuss the growing involvement of local stakeholders in watershed protection to improve and sustain the health of Texas springs, creeks, and rivers. “As more and more people move into our cities, pressure is mounting on the water resources that we used to take…

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Texas Water Symposium planned for February 23 in San Marcos: Watershed Protection Plans: Creating and Maintaining Healthy Waterways at a Community Scale

Texas Water Symposium planned for February 23 in San Marcos: Watershed Protection Plans: Creating and Maintaining Healthy Waterways at a Community Scale

  • January 24, 2017
  • News

The third Texas Water Symposium of the 2016-2017 season has been set for 7pm on Thursday, February 23rd at Texas State University Student Center LBJ Teaching Theater in San Marcos, Texas. The Texas Water Symposium is free and open to the public. With the population of Central Texas expected to double in the next thirty years and many Hill Country communities already growing at incredible rates, we are seeing an increasing threat to the health of our water resources. Local…

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The Edwards Aquifer: A Valuable Resource We Must Conserve

The Edwards Aquifer: A Valuable Resource We Must Conserve

The story of water and Texas starts right here, some 650 ft. below the surface where you are reading this. That’s the historic average for October of the J-17 well, 658 ft. above sea level, the measure that influences everything related to the Edwards Aquifer. The Edwards Aquifer is one of the most abundant artesian aquifers in the world. It supplies water to more than two million people and thousands of farmers in the region. Spread underneath Southwestern Texas, the Edwards Aquifer…

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Implementing the Cypress Creek Watershed Protection Plan

  • April 15, 2015
  • News

April 15, 2015 Meadows Center for the Environment The Cypress Creek Watershed Protection Plan has been accepted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and is currently available for public review and comment through April 30, 2015. This is one of only a handful of approved watershed protection plans in Texas, and the first with a groundwater component. The plan is designed to keep Cypress Creek clean, clear and flowing. This project is facilitated…

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GEAA announces low impact development manual

The Greater Edwards Aquifer Alliance has published “Watershed Stewardship for the Edwards Aquifer Region, a Low Impact Development Manual.” The manual was designed for developers, landscape architects, and all of those who live on, or are planning to build over our fragile aquifer recharge areas. Information about techniques that encourage infiltration of clean stormwater on site, and how plantings and landscaping can be used to mitigate stormwater pollution are outlined. Download the manual for free here.

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Living With Karst: The Benefits and Challenges of Living in a Cavernous Environment

Do you live in karst? About 25% of the US and the planet’s land surface is karst. Karst areas are the world’s most diverse, fascinating, resource-rich, yet problematic terrains. They contain the largest springs and most productive groundwater supplies on Earth. They provide unique subsurface habitat to rare animals, and their caves preserve fragile prehistoric material for millennia. They are also the landscapes most vulnerable to environmental impacts. Their groundwater is the most easily depleted and polluted. Learn more about…

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Rainwater Catchment Program

  • November 8, 2014
  • News

Ranchers and Landowners Association in collaboration with Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and Bandera County River Authority and Groundwater District will be hosting a rainwater catchment program November 15th in Bandera. Topics will include the state of Bandera County water, rainwater harvesting systems, and rainwater harvesting impact on appraisals. Details

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The United (Watershed) States of America

  • January 16, 2014
  • News

A Hill Country governed by Watersheds? This interesting blog takes a look at John Wesley Powell’s 1879 proposal; What if western states were brought into the union they be formed around watersheds, rather than arbitrary political boundaries. This idea rested on the observation that because of an arid climate, a statewide organization decided by any other factor would lead to water conflict down the road…hmmm. Read More

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