TESPA issues notice of intent to sue Permian Highway Pipeline for contamination of an underground source of drinking water

TESPA issues notice of intent to sue Permian Highway Pipeline for contamination of an underground source of drinking water

Press Release: Trinity Edwards Springs Protection Association & Wimberley Valley Watershed Association – For Immediate Release: April 8, 2020 Attorneys acting on behalf of the Trinity Edwards Springs Protection Association (TESPA) today issued a notice of intent to sue the Permian Highway Pipeline LLC (PHP) and its managing partner, Kinder Morgan, for contamination of an underground source of drinking water as a result of PHP construction operations in Blanco County on March 28, 2020. Of primary concern, and contrary to…

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An ode to tributaries

An ode to tributaries

We have a tendency to think about the water in our cup as a direct product of the local, mainstem river we presume it came from. But drinking water’s journey is rarely that straight forward. Because beer and rivers go so well together, it might be more accurate to think about that cup of drinking water more like a pint of beer. Your favorite IPA, for example, is a unique blend of water, hops, malt, and yeast. Or say you’re…

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Riverdance – Water is too precious for quarries

Riverdance – Water is too precious for quarries

Having nearly exhausted its exploitation of the Guadalupe River quarries from Comfort to Center Point in Kerr County, the sand, gravel and aggregate industry (APOs) is actively pursuing possible sites in the floodplain areas of Kendall County. Largely “under-regulated” by state law, the APO industry finds a rather benign regulatory environment in locations that are unincorporated or sparsely populated. Regrettably, many of the “material rich” locations are waterfront and on private land with absentee ownership. As a result, APO operations…

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Hays Trinity GCD announces Jacobs Well Spring Groundwater Management Zone

Hays Trinity GCD announces Jacobs Well Spring Groundwater Management Zone

On March 5, 2020, the Hays Trinity Groundwater Conservation District Board of Directors passed a new rule—Rule 15, Jacob’s Well Groundwater Management Zone—to better protect water resources and springflow during drought. This action comes in response to community requests for additional protections in Wimberley Valley’s Cypress Creek Watershed.  Rule 15 establishes the Jacob’s Well Groundwater Management Zone (GMZ), limits new permits within the GMZ, and incorporates monthly pumpage monitoring for drought restrictions for permit holders with over 2 acre-feet per…

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New financial program available for Texas communities

New financial program available for Texas communities

A new financial assistance program will soon become available to assist in the funding of drainage, flood mitigation, and flood control projects. On Nov. 5, Texas voters approved Proposition 8, a constitutional amendment providing for the creation of the Flood Infrastructure Fund (FIF). In conjunction with the constitutional amendment, the legislature made a one-time transfer of $793 million from the Economic Stabilization or “Rainy Day” Fund to the FIF via Senate Bill 500 and passed Senate Bill (SB) 7, which outlines…

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Protecting the Edwards Aquifer means protecting the contributing zone

Protecting the Edwards Aquifer means protecting the contributing zone

The total Edwards Aquifer watershed north of San Antonio is 2.5 million acres, composed of 2 million acres in the Contributing Zone and 500,000 acres in the Recharge Zone. To protect the total watershed, we must protect land and water in both zones, not just one of them. In a 2018 report, the Edwards Aquifer Authority suggested protecting 200,000 acres in the Contributing Zone within 5 miles of the recharge zone and 194,000 acres of Contributing Zone made up of land…

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Troubled waters: San Antonio weighs the cost of preserving its water supply

Troubled waters: San Antonio weighs the cost of preserving its water supply

Taxpayers have spent $260 million to protect the Edwards Aquifer. With the tax set to expire, officials can’t agree on how much more to spend. The Frio River snaked south through the hills of Uvalde County, its clear waters coursing over a bed of white, fractured limestone in the recharge zone of the Edwards Aquifer. Then, unceremoniously, it disappeared. The river had flowed into — and underneath — Dripstone Ranch, nearly 2,000 acres of undeveloped ranchland named after a system of…

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February 2020 citizen scientist spotlight: Tyson Broad

February 2020 citizen scientist spotlight: Tyson Broad

  • March 3, 2020
  • News

In addition to serving as the Watershed Coordinator for the Llano River Watershed Alliance, Tyson Broad serves on the Steering Committee of the Texas Hill Country Conservation Network. Texas Stream Team is welcoming 2020 with Tyson Broad as the first Citizen Scientist Spotlight of the year! Tyson is the co-founder and project coordinator for the Llano River Watershed Alliance (the Alliance) and dedicates countless hours to leading the efforts of water quality monitoring and riparian restoration efforts around the entire…

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TCEQ awards Meadows Center $350,000 for Cypress Creek Watershed Protection Plan

The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment at Texas State University has been awarded a $351,101 grant from the Texas Commission of Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to implement Years 4-6 of the Cypress Creek Watershed Protection Plan (WPP). The Cypress Creek WPP is the result of a six-year collaboration between numerous stakeholders working together to keep Cypress Creek clean, clear and flowing. After the plan was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and TCEQ in 2016, The Meadows…

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Officials: San Antonio should continue managing Edwards Aquifer program, not give it to SAWS

Officials: San Antonio should continue managing Edwards Aquifer program, not give it to SAWS

San Antonio should keep a program aimed at protecting the Edwards Aquifer if voters choose to shift sales tax money that funds the program to instead boost public transit, city officials said Wednesday. Mayor Ron Nirenberg has sought to settle the fate of the Edwards Aquifer protection program for the past several months. He and other local officials want the $40 million raised by the 1/8-cent sales tax to instead pay for better bus service and other initiatives at VIA…

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