The country’s cheapest water is in the West’s driest cities

The country’s cheapest water is in the West’s driest cities

  • October 16, 2018
  • News

Economists and a public policy expert at the University of Minnesota who looked into block pricing for water in the nation’s largest urban areas, including 11 Western cities, discovered a pattern they conclude is neither sustainable nor just: Many of the driest cities have the cheapest water prices. What’s more, for households across the West, the average price of water goes down as use goes up. The researchers used the Natural Resources Defense Council’s 2010 Water Sustainability Index rankings —…

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Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park to Conduct Water System Assessment After Tests Find Legionella Bacteria in Water

Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park to Conduct Water System Assessment After Tests Find Legionella Bacteria in Water

  • October 15, 2018
  • News

STONEWALL, TX – This week, the Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park received results of environmental water tests that were positive for Legionella bacteria at three sites: the pool house, the Klein shop, and the hangar visitor center. While there have been no confirmed cases of illness associated with this at the park, Legionella can cause a severe pneumonia (called Legionnaires’ disease) when people breathe in aerosolized droplets of water that contain the bacteria. Park staff with expertise in water…

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Four Missing in Junction Flooding Identified as Search Continues

Four Missing in Junction Flooding Identified as Search Continues

  • October 10, 2018
  • News

SAN ANGELO, TX — The search continues in Junction for the four people missing in the recent flooding. Oct. 8, the Llano River in Junction reached flood stage with over 118,000 cubic-feet-per second pouring into the confluence of the North and South Llano Rivers located on the east side of he City of Junction. The river reached a height well above flood stage of 31.2 feet just before 10 a.m. Oct. 8, according to data from the U.S.G.S. The height…

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Ecological Restoration Conference Taking Place November 9-11

Ecological Restoration Conference Taking Place November 9-11

  • October 10, 2018
  • News

Ecological Restoration Conference Taking Place November 9-11 Media Contact: Julia Stanford, info@txser.org or 817-301-9371 The Texas Society for Ecological Restoration will hold their 23rd Annual Conference November 9-11, 2018 at San Antonio River Authority in San Antonio, TX. Making Restoration Work in Texas is the theme as students and professionals in the field of ecological restoration share their successes, solve problems, and network. Anyone with an interest in natural resource conservation and the future of our treasured Texas environment is…

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October Director’s Notes: FESTIVAL, Rainwater Raffle and more!

October Director’s Notes: FESTIVAL, Rainwater Raffle and more!

The recent rains that have fallen across the Hill Country have me looking forward to HCA’s Hill Country Living + Rainwater Revival FESTIVAL, which is right around the corner! One of the things that I am most proud of at the Hill Country Alliance is the work we do to bring events to our region that are FUN, educational, and FREE to the public. The FESTIVAL is just that—it will be a full day of learning from 100+ vendors, exhibitors…

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Festival in Dripping Springs celebrates Hill Country living

Festival in Dripping Springs celebrates Hill Country living

  • October 8, 2018
  • News

The Hill Country Living + Rainwater Revival FESTIVAL returns to the Dripping Spring Ranch Park on Saturday, October 20, from 10am to 5pm. This free, one-day event promises something for everyone who loves the Texas Hill Country – whether you live there now, plan a move in the future, or visit often. The Hill Country Alliance (HCA), FESTIVAL planner, has packed the day with fun things to do and good things to learn about living lightly in our precious Hill…

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Blanco River named 2018 “Water To Watch” by National Fish Habitat Partnership

Blanco River named 2018 “Water To Watch” by National Fish Habitat Partnership

The Blanco River is one of the primary river networks that Central Texas communities depend upon for drinking water, flood abatement, agricultural production and recreation. Thanks to collaborative conservation work conducted by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD), landowners and other local partners, the Blanco River was named one of 20 “Waters to Watch” by the National Fish Habitat Partnership in 2018. The “Waters to Watch” are voluntary, locally-driven projects representing some of the top conservation activities in progress implemented by…

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SAWS says bid dispute won’t stop flow of Vista Ridge water

SAWS says bid dispute won’t stop flow of Vista Ridge water

On a former ranch property near an elementary school in Stone Oak, the largest water tank ever built by the San Antonio Water System is under construction. The tank is approximately 81 feet tall and big enough to hold 10 million gallons, according to SAWS Vice President of Engineering and Construction Andrea Beymer. That’s enough to fill 15 Olympic-sized swimming pools. “This is where they’ll hand off water from one water system to another water system,” said Lilliana Gonzalez, a…

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Monarch Observers Expect Largest Migration in a Decade

Monarch Observers Expect Largest Migration in a Decade

Monarch butterflies are heading to San Antonio in a year that could claim the largest migration in a decade. Based on robust activity in the monarchs’ primary Midwestern breeding grounds, Monarch Watch founder and expert Chip Taylor predicted “the migration should be the strongest since 2008.” Taylor shared the promising outlook in a recent population update on the monarch butterfly conservation organization’s blog. Read more from the Rivard Report.

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Seeking America’s Quietest Spots: The Quest for Silence in a Loud World

Seeking America’s Quietest Spots: The Quest for Silence in a Loud World

  • October 2, 2018
  • News

The hiker trudged up a logging road and into a valley, tracing a route that seemed unremarkable. There were no sweeping views of the mountains that towered nearby. There was no summit to scale. Yet he stopped suddenly, jubilant, after about four miles of walking. He had found exactly what he was searching for: quiet. “Let’s see,” said the hiker, Dennis Follensbee, “how we experience three minutes of silence.” In these loud times — with political foes yelling on television,…

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