November 2011 News Archive

  • November 30, 2011
  • News

 

November 30, 2011

It could take years for state’s aquifers to fill

A historic drought has depleted Texas aquifers to lows rarely seen since 1948, and it could take months — or even years — for the groundwater supplies to fully recharge, scientists who study NASA satellite data said Wednesday. Read more from SA Express-News.

November 28, 2011

Study finds lightly regulated wastewater plants polluting Edwards Aquifer

Dozens of lightly monitored wastewater plants west of Austin are degrading the waterways that feed Barton Springs, according to a report commissioned by the Save Our Springs Alliance and San Antonio-based Greater Edwards Aquifer Alliance. Read full article from Statesman.com.

November 17, 2011

Fines drive home Kendall’s drought restrictions

Reflecting statewide rainfall totals for most of 2011 that were well below 1956 levels and record low levels in local monitor wells, the Cow Creek Groundwater Conservation District implemented Stage Five of the drought contingency plan in June of 2011. The success of this effort to conserve groundwater can ultimately rest on the ability of a District to enforce rules. For coverage of a rare, but sometimes necessary, enforcement hearing in Kendall County. Read full SA Express-News article.

November 16, 2011

Our treasured springs need protection

The canary is in the coal mine and he’s thirsty. Without thoughtful stewardship, public treasures such as Jacob’s Well, Hays County’s historic perennial spring, as well as the private legacies of the many unnamed springs feeding Block Creek on Kendall County’s historic Hillingdon Ranch could stop flowing forever. Read full Statesman.com commentary by David K. Langford and David Baker.

November 14, 2011

Drought Effects on Our Rivers and Lakes

Water Specialist and HCA Advisory Board member, Mike Mecke, provides an overview of the current conditions of the primary lakes and rivers of Texas in the November edition of Ranch & Rural Living Magazine. Read article here.

November 3, 2011

Future of Central & South Central Texas Fish & Wildlife Now in TCEQ’s Hands

Environmental groups say that upcoming decisions by state water officials will determine the future of Central and South Central Texas rivers and bays as well as oysters, shrimp, whooping cranes, and other fish and wildlife – and economic industries dependent upon those resources. Read More