Prince Charles says people’s connection with countryside is dying

“Prince Charles has warned that the majority of people have ‘lost any real connection with the land’ as he outlined his concerns about the future of the countryside. He stressed the benefits to the wider economy of the countryside’s ‘ecosystem services’ – with meadows and other grasslands storing millions of tonnes of carbon, providing homes for pollinating insects, supporting the agricultural economy and areas of beauty attracting visitors to boost local tourism.” These issues translate here in the Texas Hill…

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Landowners Appeal Party Status to State District Court

by Environmental Stewardship Landowners Bette Brown, Andrew Meyer, Darwyn Hanna, as individuals, and Environmental Stewardship, a non-profit organization, filed a petition on November 7 in State District Court in Bastrop County, seeking to reverse a decision by Lost Pines Groundwater Conservation District (District). On September 10, 2014, the District denied the Landowners’ request to participate in a contested case hearing between End Op, L.P. (End Op), a Williamson County water marketer, the District, and Aqua Water Supply Corporation (Aqua), a…

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HCA to co-host Workshop on Riparian Function in the Pedernales Basin

  • November 12, 2014
  • News

The Hill Country Alliance, in partnership with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and The Nature Conservancy, will host a workshop on the nature and function of stream and riparian zones in the Hill Country. The workshop will feature presentations on riparian plants, basic hydrology, and techniques for ensuring healthy riparian function. The workshop will take place from 8am-4pm on Friday, December 5th. A variety of continuing education credits are available. Details

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Texas Water Symposium, Nov. 20 in Kerrville

  • November 11, 2014
  • News

Join us for the final Texas Water Symposium of 2014 – Thursday, November 20 from 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm at Schreiner University. The topic for the evening will be Balancing Rural and Urban Water Needs: How Local and Regional Planning Activities Ensure Long-Term Supplies. The Symposium will be moderated by State Representative-Elect Andrew Murr and recorded for rebroadcast by Texas Public Radio. Learn more

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Living With Karst: The Benefits and Challenges of Living in a Cavernous Environment

Do you live in karst? About 25% of the US and the planet’s land surface is karst. Karst areas are the world’s most diverse, fascinating, resource-rich, yet problematic terrains. They contain the largest springs and most productive groundwater supplies on Earth. They provide unique subsurface habitat to rare animals, and their caves preserve fragile prehistoric material for millennia. They are also the landscapes most vulnerable to environmental impacts. Their groundwater is the most easily depleted and polluted. Learn more about…

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Texas A&M Study Trumpets Texas State Parks’ Economic Benefit

“The take-away message from this study,” Dr. Crompton says, “should be that the state park system is an important contributor to the Texas economy, particularly in rural areas and that the state’s net investment in parks is returned many times over as visitors travel to enjoy the outdoors and leave their dollars behind.” Many of state’s most popular parks are right here in the Texas Hill Country. More from TPWD.

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Maps illustrate seriousness of California’s water shortage

“Groundwater is being pumped at far greater rates than it can be naturally replenished, so that many of the largest aquifers on most continents are being mined, their precious contents never to be returned.” Take a look at these maps that illustration how serious water shortages are in California, it’s essential to learn this lesson and protect healthy aquifers here in Texas, particularly here in the Hill Country.

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Next Steps for San Antonio’s Vista Ridge Project

Last week, the San Antonio City Council unanimously voted to move forward with the Vista Ridge Project that plans to bring 50,000 acre-feet of groundwater from Burleson County to the city. Because of our many concerns with this project, the vote was a disappointment, but last Thursday’s Council deliberation did stir some positives worth discussing. Read more from Texas Living Waters.

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