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Reboot: The Texas Land Trends Data Explorer

Reboot: The Texas Land Trends Data Explorer

In Texas, rural lands define our state’s identity. Whether it be for the agricultural products produced, natural resources and wildlife habitat maintained, or expanses of wide-open spaces left untouched for their intrinsic beauty, our state’s undeveloped acreage plays a crucial role in continuing our proud rural land legacy. Rural land-use changes often go unnoticed to the majority of the state population (over 80%), who reside in concentrated urban areas. Implications of change on rural lands, however, are far-reaching—affecting the state’s…

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Design Of Portion Of Dry Comal Creek Hike And Bike Trail Underway In New Braunfels

Design of portion of Dry Comal Creek Hike and Bike Trail underway in New Braunfels

New Braunfels City Council approved an agreement with San Antonio-based civil engineering firm Bain Medina Bain, Inc. during the June 14 council meeting for the final design of a portion of the Dry Comal Creek Hike and Bike Trail. The agreement allows for an expenditure of up to $375,000 and was recommended by the New Braunfels Economic Development Corporation. Bain Medina Bain will complete plans, specifications and estimates for a 1-mile portion of the trail that will begin at Walnut…

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Behold The Splendid And Fragile Beauty Of The Hill Country’s Keystone River

Behold the splendid and fragile beauty of the Hill Country’s keystone river

From April through October, I swim in the Blanco. It is one of the greatest pleasures I know. It’s a pleasure I share with growing crowds of both locals and visitors who converge on the river’s cypress-lined banks at places like Blanco State Park in Blanco; Blue Hole Regional Park on Cypress Creek, a tributary of the Blanco in Wimberley; and Five Mile Dam Park, a 34-acre Hays County park at the lower end of the river near San Marcos.…

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Jacob’s Well Is A Source Of Life For The Wimberley Valley. What Would Happen If It Were To Stop Flowing For Good?

Jacob’s Well Is A Source Of Life For The Wimberley Valley. What Would Happen If It Were To Stop Flowing For Good?

Jacob’s Well is more than just a swimming hole. It’s also a message bearer: It lets people know how much groundwater is in the aquifer beneath them. And this year — for the fourth time in its recorded history — the water at Jacob’s Well stopped flowing for a couple days. For months, it was at a dangerously low flow-rate. And even though the recent rains have replenished it some, the threat of drought and extreme summertime heat is not…

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New Law To Allow More Texas Cities To Become Dark Sky Communities

New law to allow more Texas cities to become Dark Sky communities

A new Texas law will make it easier for communities to pursue International Dark Sky designations. Texas Senate Bill 1090, authored by state Sen. Dawn Buckingham (R-Lakeway) and state Rep. Andrew Murr (R-Kerrville), was signed into law on Monday, June 14, by Gov. Greg Abbott. Effective immediately, the legislation allows communities to take the necessary steps in order to protect their night skies, according to Scenic Texas, which announced the bill’s passage in a news release. The nonprofit organization’s mission is to preserve…

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Hays County OKs Cape’s Dam Agreement

Hays County OKs Cape’s Dam Agreement

The Hays County Commissioners Court approved an interlocal agreement and memorandum of understanding with the City of San Marcos regarding the Cape’s Dam Complex. The approved MOU provides a framework for collaboration and cost-sharing in regard to the proposed rehabilitation of the Cape’s Dam Complex. Read more from Nick Castillo with San Marcos Daily Record here. 

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Austin Plans New Tactic Against Dog-killing Algae: Starve It Out

Austin plans new tactic against dog-killing algae: Starve it out

Up until a few years ago, Austinites didn’t much worry about poisonous blue-green algae sickening them and killing their dogs. Then in 2018, flooding upstream of Austin sent massive amounts of runoff down the Colorado River and into area lakes. That runoff contained agricultural and residential fertilizers, septic waste and other things that injected a supercharged dose of phosphorus into the water. Read more from Mose Buchele with Texas Public Radio here. 

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Barton Creek Habitat Preserve Conservation To Continue ‘in Perpetuity’ Following Austin Acquisition

Barton Creek Habitat Preserve conservation to continue ‘in perpetuity’ following Austin acquisition

A 10-0 vote by Austin City Council on June 3 ensured the permanent preservation nearly 4,100 acres of land home to one of the area's unique wildlife habitats and key sources of drinking water. Council via consent June 3 approved the purchase of a conservation easement on the Barton Creek Habitat Preserve, located near Hwy. 71 southeast of Bee Cave, from longtime owners and stewards The Nature Conservancy for up to $2.8 million. The Barton Creek preserve now represents one…

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Solutions To Blanco Wastewater Discharge Seeing New Light

Solutions to Blanco wastewater discharge seeing new light

The impact of the election May 1 on Blanco citizens and their Wimberley Valley neighbors downstream along the Blanco River was immediately apparent at the city’s May 11 council meeting under new mayor Rachel Lumpee, joined by new council member Connie Barron. A council previously struggling to address its first municipal utility district (MUD) achieved a number of water and wastewater planning objectives for Blanco that will directly benefit Hays County. The Blanco City Council adopted a MUD policy that…

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