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Conservationists Are Plucking The Plants That Threaten Texas Wild Rice, Fountain Darters

Conservationists are plucking the plants that threaten Texas wild rice, fountain darters

Twelve feet below the water in the San Marcos River, conservationists pluck invasive plants from the riverbed. Hydrilla and hygrophila are the victims of this widespread removal. They’re targeted because they threaten two native species that are endangered: Texas wild rice and fountain darters. The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment is on a mission to remove all non-native species and restore the river to what it once was before humans interfered with it.   Read more from Charlotte…

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New Study On Climate Change Impacts On Plants Could Lead To Better Conservation Strategies

New study on climate change impacts on plants could lead to better conservation strategies

The loss of plant species that are especially vulnerable to climate change might lead to bigger problems than previous studies have suggested, according to a new study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. If confirmed, the findings can help inform conservation strategies and lead to more accurate predictions about what ecosystems will look like in the future. Read more from Marc Airhart with UT News here.  

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Recovering America’s Wildlife Act Introduced In The U.S. Senate

Recovering America’s Wildlife Act introduced in the U.S. Senate

We're excited to announce that the Recovering America's Wildlife Act has been introduced in the U.S. Senate! S.2372 was introduced by Senator Roy Blunt (R-MO) and Senator Martin Heinrich (D-NM) — one important step closer to passing the most significant wildlife funding bill in a generation. The Recovering America's Wildlife Act will provide critical investments in conservation and habitat restoration efforts that will help declining wildlife across the country. It will also create thousands of good-paying jobs and boost the economy.…

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A Watershed Moment: Restoration Of The Sessom Creek Watershed About To Get Underway

A Watershed Moment: Restoration of the Sessom Creek Watershed about to get underway

Everyone loves those home makeover shows where a visionary decorator and demolition-loving partner take a quaint old home and turn it into a Better Homes and Gardens cover story. Well, if there was such a show for watersheds, the Sessom Creek watershed in San Marcos would definitely be featured. The only downside to this story is that the “big reveal” won’t take place for about two years or more. “The complete overhaul, so to speak, of the Sessom Creek watershed…

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Bipartisan Wildlife Proposal Would Enhance Fish And Wildlife, Add Jobs, And Grow Businesses In Texas

Bipartisan wildlife proposal would enhance fish and wildlife, add jobs, and grow businesses in Texas

During the pandemic, Texans headed back to nature in record numbers, with more people visiting state parks, hunting, fishing, and boating than ever before. A new congressional proposal aims to tap that exploding interest by investing more than $50 million per year in Texas for wildlife recovery and related public education and recreation, a move expected to boost the state’s already booming nature-based economy into overdrive. The bipartisan Recovering America’s Wildlife Act, H.R.2773, would provide $1.4 billion to state and…

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Comal County Group, Hays County Neighbors Aim To Spare Some Nature From Sprawl

Comal County group, Hays County neighbors aim to spare some nature from sprawl

People are flocking to the Texas Hill Country for its lush and rolling hills, so some in Comal and Hays counties are working together to preserve it. The Comal County Conservation Alliance recently held a virtual meeting with Hays County Precinct 3 Commissioner Lon Shell. Shell talked about Hays County’s Parks and Open Space Advisory Committee, which supported a bond to preserve land from excessive development. Both counties’ conservation efforts for the past several years have included 2,382 acres of…

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How Do Animals Safely Cross A Highway? Take A Look.

How do animals safely cross a highway? Take a look.

The engineers were used to building overpasses for vehicles, not wildlife. But every spring and fall, collisions with mule deer and pronghorn spiked in the Pinedale region of Wyoming, where Route 191 disrupted the animals’ age-old migration paths. So the state Department of Transportation joined with the state wildlife agency and nonprofit groups to create a series of crossings, including the one pictured above. Collisions have dropped by roughly 90 percent.   Read more about wildlife crossings from Catrin Einhorn…

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The Florida Wildlife Corridor Is Nearly 18 Million Acres Of Natural Wonder. The State Just Took A Significant Step To Keep It Alive

The Florida Wildlife Corridor is nearly 18 million acres of natural wonder. The state just took a significant step to keep it alive

Wedged between Florida's two coasts are some of the richest ecosystems in the US, teeming with native wildlife that prefers to be hidden from human view. The animals' natural lives for the most part remain a secret to Floridians. To catch glimpses of them in the wild, Carlton Ward Jr. sets a camera trap and bides his time. Read more from Scottie Andrew with CNN here.

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Barton Creek Habitat Preserve Conservation To Continue ‘in Perpetuity’ Following Austin Acquisition

Barton Creek Habitat Preserve conservation to continue ‘in perpetuity’ following Austin acquisition

A 10-0 vote by Austin City Council on June 3 ensured the permanent preservation nearly 4,100 acres of land home to one of the area's unique wildlife habitats and key sources of drinking water. Council via consent June 3 approved the purchase of a conservation easement on the Barton Creek Habitat Preserve, located near Hwy. 71 southeast of Bee Cave, from longtime owners and stewards The Nature Conservancy for up to $2.8 million. The Barton Creek preserve now represents one…

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New Braunfels One Step Closer To Hike-and-bike Trail

New Braunfels one step closer to hike-and-bike trail

New Braunfels is one step closer to a new hike-and-bike trail. On May 20, the New Braunfels Economic Development Board approved a $375,000 deal with San Antonio-based engineering firm Bain Medina Bain to finalize design on a portion of the Dry Comal Creek Hike and Bike Trail. According to the Herald-Zeitung, the deal includes "civil, survey, environmental, wayfinding, materials testing and landscape architecture" for the new trail. Dry Comal Creek Hike and Bike Trail is part of the of the Dry…

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