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Freshwater Mussels In Guadalupe River Could Go On Endangered List Because Waters They Live In Have Changed

Freshwater mussels in Guadalupe River could go on endangered list because waters they live in have changed

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed placing six Texas freshwater mussels on the endangered species list and designating nearly 2,000 miles of Texas rivers as critical habitat for them. The Guadalupe River Basin — one of four river basins highlighted by the proposal — is home to three of the mussels: the Guadalupe fatmucket, the false spike and the Guadalupe orb. As bottom feeders, freshwater mussels are vital to the Texas Hill Country’s ecology and food chain.  …

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Opinion: Unconscionable If Lawmakers Were To Ignore Water Infrastructure

Opinion: Unconscionable if lawmakers were to ignore water infrastructure

Less than a year ago, at the end of a particularly vicious peak in the pandemic, half of Texas was without drinking water. Some neighborhoods went dry for weeks. COVID-19 in the aftermath of Winter Storm Uri was a public health emergency that should never be repeated. Yet this week, despite billions of federal funds available to fix the problem, the Texas Legislature could decide to turn a blind eye to the most essential of all health systems — our…

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Mansfield Concrete Plant Plans Were Shot Down. Is Battle Back On After Texas Ruling?

Mansfield concrete plant plans were shot down. Is battle back on after Texas ruling?

Anyone unfamiliar with the heated debates over the impact of concrete batch plants on Texas’ environment could be forgiven for glancing over Item No. 38 on the Sept. 22 meeting agenda. The proposal to amend a Texas Commission on Environmental Quality air pollution rule didn’t stick out among the jargon frequently used by the agency. But, for a group of Tarrant County homeowners living just outside of Mansfield, the rule change represents an unwelcome new chapter in their three-year battle…

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Commentary: This Session, Make Water A Priority

Commentary: This session, make water a priority

More than half of all Texans lost water during last February’s deadly winter storm. It was a warning of trouble to come. Our state’s water infrastructure is the backbone of our economy, and it is aging and fragile. Just one week before the storm knocked out water and power service, the Texas Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers gave Texas’ huge network of water pipes and treatment plants a C grade. Further, the 2022 State Water Plan projects…

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The State Of Texas Water Infrastructure

The state of Texas water infrastructure

Earlier this month, during a special session of the Texas Legislature, the Texas Capitol flooded. After the water stopped cascading down the pink granite walls inside the Capitol extension, the Legislature resumed its deliberations. The August flood was preceded by February’s Winter Storm Uri. Between 200 and 700 Texans died in the cold and dark after days without power and, in some places, without water.   Read more from Todd Votteler in this article from the Texas Tribune.

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Texas Water Utilities Provide A Snapshot Of Financial Conditions And Prospects For Addressing Texas Water Infrastructure Needs In 2021 And 2022

Texas Water Utilities provide a snapshot of financial conditions and prospects for addressing Texas water infrastructure needs in 2021 and 2022

Recently, Water Opinions LLC teamed up with the Texas Water Infrastructure Network (TXWIN) for the second annual assessment of current and future Texas water infrastructure projects, financing, and other issues facing Texas water utilities. TXWIN distributed the survey to its members and recruited the Texas Section of the American Water Works Association, Texas Water Conservation Association, the Water Environment Association of Texas, the Texas Water Utilities Association, and the Texas Rural Water Association to distribute the survey to their members…

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Deal To Preserve Honey Creek Moves Forward With Texas Parks And Wildlife Approval

Deal to preserve Honey Creek moves forward with Texas Parks and Wildlife approval

A land deal that could forever preserve a pristine Hill Country stream north of San Antonio moved forward with approval from Texas Parks and Wildlife Department commissioners. Commissioners on Thursday unanimously voted in favor of a land deal involving the department, the Nature Conservancy, and Texas Parks and Wildlife Foundation that would preserve 515 acres at the headwaters of Honey Creek. The private ranch land intended for purchase lies upstream of Guadalupe River State Park and Honey Creek State Natural…

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Family’s Ranching Heritage At Stake In Inheritance Tax Battle

Family’s ranching heritage at stake in inheritance tax battle

At 84 years old, Melville Steubing has been involved in ranching since he could walk. And his family’s ranching heritage runs even deeper. From the first year his German immigrant ancestors set foot on Texas ground in the 1840s until today, there has never been a time when the Steubings were not involved in agriculture.   Read more from Jennifer Whitlock with Texas Farm Bureau here.

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Six Texas Freshwater Mussels Proposed For Endangered Species Act Protection

Six Texas freshwater mussels proposed for Endangered Species Act Protection

AUSTIN, Texas— Following litigation by the Center for Biological Diversity, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today proposed to protect six species of Texas freshwater mussels under the Endangered Species Act. The Service also proposed designating 1,944 river miles as critical habitat for the mussels. The Texas pimpleback, Guadalupe orb, Texas fatmucket, Guadalupe fatmucket and false spike will be listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act, while the Texas fawnsfoot will be classified as threatened. All six species inhabit…

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How Discharged Wastewater Is Feeding Massive Hill Country Algae Blooms

How discharged wastewater is feeding massive Hill Country algae blooms

Green mats coat what once were clear, scenic creeks and rivers, the result of algae blooms that are frustrating those who live in the Texas Hill Country. Effluent is wastewater with its pollutants removed, also known as treated wastewater. When effluent is discharged into creeks in the Hill Country, they experience massive algae blooms, specifically a type called Cladophora glomerata, which attaches to creek beds instead of floating on top of the water like the blue-green algae found in Lady…

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