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How This Texas Town Became One Of America’s Fastest-growing Cities

How this Texas town became one of America’s fastest-growing cities

In the not-too-distant past, motorists driving along a stretch of Interstate 35 just northeast of San Antonio were met with vast fields of wildflowers and grazing cows in grassy pastures. Today, the cattle are gone, replaced with clusters of sleek apartments, gated communities and big-box stores. And New Braunfels, the third-fastest-growing city in America, tucked in one of the fastest-growing regions, finds itself at a crossroads.   Read more from Edgar Sandoval from the New York Times here.

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The Key To Slowing Traffic Is Street Design, Not Speed Limits

The key to slowing traffic is street design, not speed limits

On September 8, Wiley & Sons will release the second book in the Strong Towns series: Confessions of a Recovering Engineer: A Strong Towns Approach to Transportation. Chapter five is about building great streets and how it is essential, if we want places that are prosperous and productive, that we focus on how streets build wealth for a community instead of how efficiently they move vehicles. It is impossible to build a place that people want to be in if…

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A Drought So Dire That A Utah Town Pulled The Plug On Growth

A drought so dire that a Utah town pulled the plug on growth

The mountain spring that pioneers used to water their hayfields and that filled people’s taps flowed reliably into the old cowboy town of Oakley for decades. So when it dwindled to a trickle in this year’s scorching drought, officials took drastic action to preserve their water: They stopped building. During the coronavirus pandemic, the real estate market in their 1,750-person city boomed as remote workers flocked in from the West Coast and second homeowners staked weekend ranches. But those newcomers…

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What Future Do We Desire For The Trinity Aquifers?

What future do we desire for the Trinity Aquifers?

Across the Hill Country, residents and visitors depend on the groundwater stored in the Trinity Aquifers as water supply and to provide baseflow through springs that keep iconic creeks and rivers flowing.  Residents have a voice through the regional planning process to discuss and set goals to guide the future we desire for the Trinity Aquifers. Read more from Robin Gary with Wimberley Valley Watershed Association here.

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Thousands Of Residences, Lots More Planned For New Marble Falls Community

Thousands of residences, lots more planned for new Marble Falls community

A North Texas developer is gearing up to break ground on the first phase of a transformative mixed-use project in Marble Falls, which eventually could bring nearly 2,000 homes, hundreds of apartments, commercial space and sports fields to the Hill Country city. Centurion American Development Group, based in Farmers Branch outside Dallas, is spearheading the 1,100-acre Thunder Rock development, which is located at the northwest corner of U.S. Highway 281 and State Highway 71, about 50 miles northwest of Austin.…

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What Future Do We Desire For The Trinity Aquifers?

What future do we desire for the Trinity Aquifers?

Across the Hill Country, residents and visitors depend on the groundwater stored in the Trinity Aquifers as water supply and to provide baseflow through springs that keep iconic creeks and rivers flowing. Residents have a voice through the regional planning process to discuss and set goals to guide the future we desire for the Trinity Aquifers.   Read more from Robin Gary with Wimberley Valley Watershed Association here.

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Texas Leaders Made A Big Mistake Ignoring Water This Session. But Not All Hope Is Lost.

Texas leaders made a big mistake ignoring water this session. But not all hope is lost.

Last weekend I paddled on the Blanco River with my family. We swam in spring-fed swimming holes, fly fished and lounged in shallow sections of the river, which was flowing nicely thanks to recent rains that ended drought conditions across Texas. Read more from Vanessa Puig-Williams with Environmental Defense Fund here. 

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Reboot: The Texas Land Trends Data Explorer

Reboot: The Texas Land Trends Data Explorer

In Texas, rural lands define our state’s identity. Whether it be for the agricultural products produced, natural resources and wildlife habitat maintained, or expanses of wide-open spaces left untouched for their intrinsic beauty, our state’s undeveloped acreage plays a crucial role in continuing our proud rural land legacy. Rural land-use changes often go unnoticed to the majority of the state population (over 80%), who reside in concentrated urban areas. Implications of change on rural lands, however, are far-reaching—affecting the state’s…

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Design Of Portion Of Dry Comal Creek Hike And Bike Trail Underway In New Braunfels

Design of portion of Dry Comal Creek Hike and Bike Trail underway in New Braunfels

New Braunfels City Council approved an agreement with San Antonio-based civil engineering firm Bain Medina Bain, Inc. during the June 14 council meeting for the final design of a portion of the Dry Comal Creek Hike and Bike Trail. The agreement allows for an expenditure of up to $375,000 and was recommended by the New Braunfels Economic Development Corporation. Bain Medina Bain will complete plans, specifications and estimates for a 1-mile portion of the trail that will begin at Walnut…

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Hays County OKs Cape’s Dam Agreement

Hays County OKs Cape’s Dam Agreement

The Hays County Commissioners Court approved an interlocal agreement and memorandum of understanding with the City of San Marcos regarding the Cape’s Dam Complex. The approved MOU provides a framework for collaboration and cost-sharing in regard to the proposed rehabilitation of the Cape’s Dam Complex. Read more from Nick Castillo with San Marcos Daily Record here. 

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