Subscribe |  Donate  |  Shop  |  Endowment  |  Careers  |  Contact
Conservationists Are Plucking The Plants That Threaten Texas Wild Rice, Fountain Darters

Conservationists are plucking the plants that threaten Texas wild rice, fountain darters

Twelve feet below the water in the San Marcos River, conservationists pluck invasive plants from the riverbed. Hydrilla and hygrophila are the victims of this widespread removal. They’re targeted because they threaten two native species that are endangered: Texas wild rice and fountain darters. The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment is on a mission to remove all non-native species and restore the river to what it once was before humans interfered with it.   Read more from Charlotte…

Read More
A Watershed Moment: Restoration Of The Sessom Creek Watershed About To Get Underway

A Watershed Moment: Restoration of the Sessom Creek Watershed about to get underway

Everyone loves those home makeover shows where a visionary decorator and demolition-loving partner take a quaint old home and turn it into a Better Homes and Gardens cover story. Well, if there was such a show for watersheds, the Sessom Creek watershed in San Marcos would definitely be featured. The only downside to this story is that the “big reveal” won’t take place for about two years or more. “The complete overhaul, so to speak, of the Sessom Creek watershed…

Read More
From Time To Time: Preserving Cultural Resources Key Component Of EAHCP

From Time to Time: Preserving cultural resources key component of EAHCP

Where did the time go? Time flies. There’s no time like the present. Don’t waste your time. People are familiar with the notion that time marches on at its own pace and we express how we deal with that in many ways. And while today’s culture seems to be preoccupied with what’s coming next due to the meteoric evolution of technology, there are very good reasons to maintain a solid connection to humanity’s past. In South Central Texas, that past…

Read More
Drought, The Everything Disaster

Drought, the everything disaster

It develops in stages, a story that builds upon itself. A few cloudless days. Then a rain-free week. Soon a hot, dry month. Now the hills are brown and the crops need watering — the first signs of drought. The intensely dry conditions that have settled over the American West and Upper Midwest this year are well past the brown hills stage. Nearly 89 percent of nine western states are in some form of drought, and more than a quarter…

Read More
A Drought So Dire That A Utah Town Pulled The Plug On Growth

A drought so dire that a Utah town pulled the plug on growth

The mountain spring that pioneers used to water their hayfields and that filled people’s taps flowed reliably into the old cowboy town of Oakley for decades. So when it dwindled to a trickle in this year’s scorching drought, officials took drastic action to preserve their water: They stopped building. During the coronavirus pandemic, the real estate market in their 1,750-person city boomed as remote workers flocked in from the West Coast and second homeowners staked weekend ranches. But those newcomers…

Read More
What Future Do We Desire For The Trinity Aquifers?

What future do we desire for the Trinity Aquifers?

Across the Hill Country, residents and visitors depend on the groundwater stored in the Trinity Aquifers as water supply and to provide baseflow through springs that keep iconic creeks and rivers flowing.  Residents have a voice through the regional planning process to discuss and set goals to guide the future we desire for the Trinity Aquifers. Read more from Robin Gary with Wimberley Valley Watershed Association here.

Read More
Healthy Creeks Initiative Underway

Healthy Creeks Initiative Underway

This month, contractors will begin the annual control efforts to manage Arundo along the Pedernales River and several tributary creeks. Arundo, also referred to as Giant Reed or Carrizo Cane, is a non-native, invasive plant that can take over creeks and rivers. Since 2016, the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department (TPWD), Hill Country Alliance (HCA), City of Fredericksburg, and other organizations have partnered with volunteering landowners through the Healthy Creeks Initiative to control Arundo and enhance the creek-side (or riparian)…

Read More
Texas Reimagines The Fight Against Floods

Texas reimagines the fight against floods

For more than 60 years, the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) has been tasked with leading Texas efforts in securing the state’s water supply through the conservation and development of Texas’ water resources. The agency’s framework for fulfilling this mission combines the three key functions of science, planning, and financing.   Read more from Peter Lake in the Texas Water Journal here.

Read More
What’s A 100-year Flood? A Hydrologist Explains

What’s a 100-year flood? A hydrologist explains

A 100-year flood, like a 100-year storm, is one so severe it has only a 1% chance of hitting in any given year. Unfortunately, many people believe that if they experienced a 100-year flood this year, they will not see another one like it for 99 years. It just doesn’t work that way. In reality, the chance of being flooded next year, and the year after that, is the same as it was when the house flooded the first time…

Read More
What Future Do We Desire For The Trinity Aquifers?

What future do we desire for the Trinity Aquifers?

Across the Hill Country, residents and visitors depend on the groundwater stored in the Trinity Aquifers as water supply and to provide baseflow through springs that keep iconic creeks and rivers flowing. Residents have a voice through the regional planning process to discuss and set goals to guide the future we desire for the Trinity Aquifers.   Read more from Robin Gary with Wimberley Valley Watershed Association here.

Read More