Subscribe |  Donate  |  Shop  |  Endowment  |  Careers  |  Contact
‘Nonfunctional’ Grass To Be Banned In Las Vegas Valley

‘Nonfunctional’ grass to be banned in Las Vegas Valley

The days for much of the water-thirsty grass in the drought-stricken Las Vegas Valley are numbered. Nearly one-third of all of the grass in Southern Nevada will need to be removed by the end of 2026 under a new bill signed into law by Gov. Steve Sisolak Friday, a significant conservation effort that comes as the state is facing its first federal water shortage amid declining Lake Mead levels and a two-decades-long drought that has shown no signs of ending.…

Read More
Climate Change Is Intensifying The Water Cycle, New IPCC Report Finds

Climate change is intensifying the water cycle, new IPCC report finds

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, a group of the world’s leading climate scientists, released its sixth climate assessment on Monday. The 1,300-page paper is the most comprehensive, up-to-date report yet on the physical science of climate change, synthesizing the findings of thousands of recent publications. The report paints an alarming picture of the future of fresh water. It concludes that man-made contributions to a warming planet are far-reaching.   Read more about the IPCC report from Laura Gersony with…

Read More
Young Life Camp Withdraws Wastewater Permit, Will Employ Zero-discharge Approach

Young Life camp withdraws wastewater permit, will employ zero-discharge approach

LoneHollow Ranch, a camp in the Vanderpool area owned by Young Life, a Colorado-based Christian organization, recently announced they will be withdrawing their wastewater discharge permit from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) and moving forward with a zero-discharge water conservation plan. The new zero-discharge plan, developed in a collaboration with the Cibolo Conservatory and also based on discussions with TCEQ, utilizes two complementary permits governing water usage on the property. Read more from the Bandera Bulletin here.

Read More
Big News On Young Life Permit

Big news on Young Life permit

HCA is happy to share some GREAT news from the Bandera Canyonlands Alliance, LoneHollow Ranch, and The Cibolo Conservancy! After months of opposition, including a petition garnering nearly 25,000 signatures and three county resolutions opposing the wastewater permit application, Young Life's LoneHollow Ranch has announced they will be withdrawing their request for a TCEQ discharge permit. Instead, they will be enacting a Zero-Discharge water conservation plan and pursuing a Texas Land Application Permit (TLAP). Read on for an excerpt from BCA's recent press release…

Read More
2021 Texas Legislative Recap – Key Bills For Agriculture

2021 Texas legislative recap – key bills for agriculture

As we do after every Texas Legislative Session, we’re here with a recap of the 87th Texas Legislature and the bills impacting agriculture.  As you will see, it was a busy session with a number of ag-related bills being passed.  We have linked each bill below to allow easy access to the full text. Also, as has become tradition, J Pete Laney joined me on the Ag Law in the Field Podcast to discuss these bills and give us his…

Read More
San Antonio Built A Pipeline To Rural Central Texas To Increase Its Water Supply. Now Local Landowners Say Their Wells Are Running Dry.

San Antonio built a pipeline to rural Central Texas to increase its water supply. Now local landowners say their wells are running dry.

When the water finally arrived, San Antonio’s leadership could relax. The roughly 150-mile long water pipeline to the northeast guaranteed the city’s economic future and freed residents from the stress of droughts. “We have water security for decades to come,” said Robert Puente, president and CEO of the San Antonio Water System. Puente called the project, which came online in April 2020, the "biggest achievement in our lifetimes" to secure water for the city. The pipeline helped conserve the sensitive…

Read More
Conservationists Are Plucking The Plants That Threaten Texas Wild Rice, Fountain Darters

Conservationists are plucking the plants that threaten Texas wild rice, fountain darters

Twelve feet below the water in the San Marcos River, conservationists pluck invasive plants from the riverbed. Hydrilla and hygrophila are the victims of this widespread removal. They’re targeted because they threaten two native species that are endangered: Texas wild rice and fountain darters. The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment is on a mission to remove all non-native species and restore the river to what it once was before humans interfered with it.   Read more from Charlotte…

Read More
A Watershed Moment: Restoration Of The Sessom Creek Watershed About To Get Underway

A Watershed Moment: Restoration of the Sessom Creek Watershed about to get underway

Everyone loves those home makeover shows where a visionary decorator and demolition-loving partner take a quaint old home and turn it into a Better Homes and Gardens cover story. Well, if there was such a show for watersheds, the Sessom Creek watershed in San Marcos would definitely be featured. The only downside to this story is that the “big reveal” won’t take place for about two years or more. “The complete overhaul, so to speak, of the Sessom Creek watershed…

Read More
From Time To Time: Preserving Cultural Resources Key Component Of EAHCP

From Time to Time: Preserving cultural resources key component of EAHCP

Where did the time go? Time flies. There’s no time like the present. Don’t waste your time. People are familiar with the notion that time marches on at its own pace and we express how we deal with that in many ways. And while today’s culture seems to be preoccupied with what’s coming next due to the meteoric evolution of technology, there are very good reasons to maintain a solid connection to humanity’s past. In South Central Texas, that past…

Read More
Drought, The Everything Disaster

Drought, the everything disaster

It develops in stages, a story that builds upon itself. A few cloudless days. Then a rain-free week. Soon a hot, dry month. Now the hills are brown and the crops need watering — the first signs of drought. The intensely dry conditions that have settled over the American West and Upper Midwest this year are well past the brown hills stage. Nearly 89 percent of nine western states are in some form of drought, and more than a quarter…

Read More