Texas planners look to aquifers to prepare for next drought

Texas planners look to aquifers to prepare for next drought

The torrential storms of last month essentially ended one of Texas’ worst droughts, but much of the excess water has already flowed into the Gulf of Mexico or will evaporate by year’s end. With a wary eye toward the next prolonged dry-streak that inevitably will come, some think expanding the use of underground aquifers may help slake the thirst of Texas’ rapidly growing population. Three trillion gallons of water gushed from swollen Texas rivers into the Gulf of Mexico in…

Read More
The Texas Drought is over, but what about the next?

The Texas Drought is over, but what about the next?

The drought that just ended (in all but a small corner of the Texas Panhandle, according to the latest U.S. Drought Monitor) made Texans aware of the importance of a reliable water supply, for themselves and for the state’s economy. The Texas Legislature in 2013 backed up the State Water Plan with a mechanism for new project funding, including conservation, and the electorate concurred. That well-placed concern, and in some cases panic, about reliable water has been displaced by rain. The…

Read More
Healthy rivers a priority for Texas

Healthy rivers a priority for Texas

Texas Water Development Board: The health of our state’s rivers affects the simple pleasures of many Texans. Fishing, tubing, and enjoying nature’s beauty all rely on maintaining the complex ecosystems of our rivers. Not only do they harbor a variety of species and volumes of nutrients, but they support our economy through tourism, outdoor recreation, water supply, and many other industries. To ensure our rivers remain healthy, Texas has made studying and understanding their intricate ecosystems a priority. In 2001,…

Read More
“Transferring water from one area to another has social and environmental consequences”

“Transferring water from one area to another has social and environmental consequences”

Sierra Club, Lone Star Chapter: TAKE ACTION! “House Bill 3298 is set to be debated on the Texas House floor Thursday, May 7 – the bill would direct the state’s water planning agency to evaluate how to establish and operate a state water conveyance network – a massive plumbing system of pipelines, pumping stations, reservoirs, and other infrastructure to move large amounts of water around Texas. “Transferring water from one area to another has social and environmental consequences” – Con…

Read More
Kramer: Water grid proposal not right for Texas

Kramer: Water grid proposal not right for Texas

  Critical vote Thursday, May 7th: Many Texans find satisfaction in being different from California. But a new legislative proposal would have Texas follow the deeply flawed California model of massive and costly pumping of water all over the state. This approach leads to crisis management when the “wet” areas of the state face an extended drought, and communities relying on imported water are left high and dry. House Bill 3298 by state Rep. Lyle Larson (R-San Antonio) and Senate…

Read More

California drought in the news

It seems that everywhere we turn, there is news of the historic drought currently gripping California. Could the current water shortage mark the end ofCalifornia’s booming growth? Or is it simply another obstacle to overcome – a “resource management issue,” as some put it. Others are looking at how California can encourage water-saving behavior changes – to reduce water use by 25% below 2013 levels – without rationing at the household level. And as the drought and below average snow…

Read More

One year of water left in California?

California has mandated a 25% cut in water use one month after an LA Times op-ed by NASA scientist Jay Famiglietti kicked off with: “California has about one year of water left.” But, what did that headline actually mean? “One of the key points of the op-ed was that, since we will be relying more heavily on groundwater this year (perhaps an unprecedented 85% to 90% statewide), that we need to be extremely mindful to use it sparingly — all…

Read More
Short-term water, long-term consequences for Hill Country

Short-term water, long-term consequences for Hill Country

The Vista Ridge water project in San Antonio threatens to follow a dangerous precedent: draining water from one region to another in a way that will only increase exurban sprawl in the Hill Country. If this solution seems familiar it should: It’s the California model that has led to that state having one year of water left. The Vista Ridge pipeline is a multibillion-dollar project to pipe 50,000 acre feet of water a year, 142 miles across five counties. That…

Read More