Arsenic persists in some Texas water supplies

Arsenic persists in some Texas water supplies

Drinking water systems serving 51,000 people in several dozen rural Texas communities exceeded federal drinking water standards for arsenic for more than a decade, according to a report to be published Monday by an environmental group. The Environmental Integrity Project’s report, titled “Don’t Drink the Water,” says the state should do more to warn Texans about the dangers of arsenic, a carcinogen. None of the water systems identified in the report are in the Austin area. They are chiefly in…

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Will Dripping Springs sewage expansion foul Onion Creek?

Will Dripping Springs sewage expansion foul Onion Creek?

  • February 5, 2016
  • News

From his rolling Hill Country spread, Wes Pitts can watch changes in gray-green Onion Creek as it riffles by. This is the same creek that twice in 2015 flooded poor neighborhoods in Southeast Austin, but here, miles upstream, on a windy, dry late January day, it wends amiably. From beneath the oaks, pecans and elms that line the banks, Pitts can catch perch, bass and crawfish. In some calmer spots, the water is still and clear; in others, whitewater dribbles…

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Sewage Spill in the Llano River

Sewage Spill in the Llano River

  • February 1, 2016
  • News

Ironically, a few days before the Texas Stream Team training at Texas Tech Junction, members of the Llano River Watershed Alliance hiking just downstream of the junction of the North and South Llano Rivers, observed pools of algae-covered water along the Llano River near the Interstate-10 Bridge. Upon notifying the City, Junction Mayor Russell Hammonds and the City’s Water and wastewater Superintendent investigated the report and discovered that the sanitary sewer line coming from a local motel had become disconnected from the City Lift Station serving the motel. Read more from the Llano Watershed Alliance

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Advocates Petition EPA to Strip Texas of Some Environmental Responsibilities

Advocates Petition EPA to Strip Texas of Some Environmental Responsibilities

  • January 13, 2016
  • News

Petition says Texas programs no longer meet fundamental federal air and water safeguards, can’t protect the public.  Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) and Caddo Lake Institute (CLI) are asking America’s environmental protection agency to strip Texas of some of the responsibilities that it had previously delegated to the state under the nation’s Clean Air Act and Clean Water Act. The groups filed a petition  with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) last night asking the federal agency to “review and withdraw its…

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Q&A with Meredith Miller

Q&A with Meredith Miller

The Texas Tribune has published an excellent Q and A piece with Meredith Miller on the Meadows Center for Water and the Environment’s citizen science Texas Stream Team. In addition to her other numerous duties at the Meadows Center, Meredith oversees the many citizen volunteers that monitor and protect our state’s watersheds. The Q&A: Meredith Miller by Madlin Mekelburg Dec. 1, 2015 Trib+Water Meredith Miller is a senior program coordinator at the Meadows Center for Water and the Environment at…

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Settlement reached in Wimberley wastewater discharge permit application

Settlement reached in Wimberley wastewater discharge permit application

  • November 8, 2015
  • News

On Tuesday, September 29, 2015, the City of Wimberley, the Blanco River Cypress Creek Water Association, the Paradise Valley Property Owners Association, Rocky River Ranch, and KKP3237, LLC reached a settlement agreement in the contested proceeding on the City’s proposed wastewater discharge permit application pending before the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.  With the settlement, the parties will be able to dismiss the case, allowing the City to move forward with financing and constructing the proposed wastewater treatment plant and…

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Editorial: Dripping should rethink Onion Creek disposal site

Editorial: Dripping should rethink Onion Creek disposal site

  • September 23, 2015
  • News

Onion Creek is both a defining landmark and a potent talisman for our community, symbolizing as it does both the bounteous wonder and the fragility of our little part of the world. In peril from recurrent drought and changing climate, and even development on its banks, now Onion Creek could become a sewage disposal site. The city of Dripping Springs is preparing to submit for a permit to discharge waste water into the creek. The city’s formal application to the…

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TCEQ grants permit to take land for private developer despite judge’s ruling

TCEQ grants permit to take land for private developer despite judge’s ruling

  • September 18, 2015
  • News

The Graham family can never seem to cut a break from big government. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), the state agency that grants wastewater permits, approved a permit for the neighboring developer of Johnson Ranch in spite of the fact that Administrative Law JudgeSarah Ramos, who heard the Graham’s case in a contested case hearing, ruled that the permit should be denied. Allowing the developer to dump its treated sewage onto the Graham’s property means they’ll lose that…

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Join GEAA protecting landowner rights and water

Join GEAA protecting landowner rights and water

  • September 6, 2015
  • News

TCEQ recently approved a plan by the Johnson Ranch subdivision in Comal County to dump approximately 350,000 gallons per day of treated sewage effluent on their neighbors’ land. Neighboring families have spent the last year and hundreds of thousands of dollars fighting to keep their land from being taken for use as sewage infrastructure for a neighboring housing development. A petition is being circulated to support these landowners. Read more from GEAA:   How would you feel if your neighbor…

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Texas Farmers Brace for New Clean Water Rule

Texas Farmers Brace for New Clean Water Rule

  • September 2, 2015
  • News

In the 65 years that Tommy Calvert has grown hay and raised cattle in Denton County, he’s never applied for a federal permit. But with a new national clean water rule in effect, he’s not sure if it’s something he needs to think about. After heavy rains, runoff from his fields sometimes reaches a creek near his 300-acre farm, and Calvert doesn’t know if that tenuous connection to the drinking water supply might be enough to bring him under federal…

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