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Ranch Fever: Pandemic Drives City Slickers To Seek Out Room To Roam

Ranch fever: Pandemic drives city slickers to seek out room to roam

The allure of wide-open spaces is drawing people to snatch up rural land in Texas at a record pace. Ranch sales in the state nearly doubled between the second quarter of 2021 and the previous year, according to data from the Texas A&M Real Estate Center. While the pandemic played a role in driving down sales in the early part of 2020, the market rebounded considerably, surpassing brokers’ expectations and far exceeding 2019 numbers.   Read more from Shari Biediger…

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Wild Rice Sues To Stop Oil Pipeline

Wild rice sues to stop oil pipeline

In 2018, the White Earth Band of Ojibwe and the 1855 Treaty Authority, an organization that upholds treaty rights for Chippewa bands, enacted legal personhood for manoomin -- wild rice. Manoomin, which translates to “good berry” in Ojibwe, is a sacred food for Chippewa, Ojibwe and Anishinaabe people and has been a part of traditional teachings, stories and way of life since time immemorial.   Read more from Jessica Douglas with High Country News here.

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Comal County Seeks Grants For Conservation Purchases

Comal County seeks grants for conservation purchases

Preserving Comal County’s wide-open spaces hasn’t been at the top of the county’s to-do list, but commissioners took steps in that direction last week. Last Thursday, they selected Moriarty & Associates LLC to pursue funding for county land acquisitions for wildlife conservation and water source protection. It approved $4,500 for the firm to prepare county applications for grants through the Texas Water Development Board’s Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF). “Behind the scenes, I’ve been working for years to find…

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40 Million People Rely On The Colorado River. It’s Drying Up Fast.

40 million people rely on the Colorado River. It’s drying up fast.

On a 110-degree day several years ago, surrounded by piles of sand and rock in the desert outside Las Vegas, I stepped into a yellow cage large enough to fit three standing adults and was lowered 600 feet through a black hole into the ground. There, at the bottom, amid pooling water and dripping rock, was an enormous machine driving a cone-shaped drill bit into the earth. The machine was carving a cavernous, three-mile tunnel beneath the bottom of the…

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Texas Water Utilities Provide A Snapshot Of Financial Conditions And Prospects For Addressing Texas Water Infrastructure Needs In 2021 And 2022

Texas Water Utilities provide a snapshot of financial conditions and prospects for addressing Texas water infrastructure needs in 2021 and 2022

Recently, Water Opinions LLC teamed up with the Texas Water Infrastructure Network (TXWIN) for the second annual assessment of current and future Texas water infrastructure projects, financing, and other issues facing Texas water utilities. TXWIN distributed the survey to its members and recruited the Texas Section of the American Water Works Association, Texas Water Conservation Association, the Water Environment Association of Texas, the Texas Water Utilities Association, and the Texas Rural Water Association to distribute the survey to their members…

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Deal To Preserve Honey Creek Moves Forward With Texas Parks And Wildlife Approval

Deal to preserve Honey Creek moves forward with Texas Parks and Wildlife approval

A land deal that could forever preserve a pristine Hill Country stream north of San Antonio moved forward with approval from Texas Parks and Wildlife Department commissioners. Commissioners on Thursday unanimously voted in favor of a land deal involving the department, the Nature Conservancy, and Texas Parks and Wildlife Foundation that would preserve 515 acres at the headwaters of Honey Creek. The private ranch land intended for purchase lies upstream of Guadalupe River State Park and Honey Creek State Natural…

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Family’s Ranching Heritage At Stake In Inheritance Tax Battle

Family’s ranching heritage at stake in inheritance tax battle

At 84 years old, Melville Steubing has been involved in ranching since he could walk. And his family’s ranching heritage runs even deeper. From the first year his German immigrant ancestors set foot on Texas ground in the 1840s until today, there has never been a time when the Steubings were not involved in agriculture.   Read more from Jennifer Whitlock with Texas Farm Bureau here.

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Droughts Push More People To Migrate Than Floods

Droughts push more people to migrate than floods

After a year of extreme weather, people in the drylands of northern California and the hurricane-drenched bayous of southern Louisiana are brooding on the same question: should we leave? New global research suggests that one of these “water shock” scenarios is more likely to result in migration. World Bank researchers found that people are five times as likely to move following drought conditions as they are after floods or periods of excess water.   Read more from Brett Walton with…

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From The Toilet To The Sink: Water Recycling Battles Scarcity

From the toilet to the sink: water recycling battles scarcity

Would you take a swig of water from your faucet if it originally came from the sewer? Treating wastewater to put it back into public use can help against water crises around the world, according to the United Nations, though the practice has to overcome the "yuck" factor among the public. Wastewater that has been through a treatment plant is typically discharged into rivers.   Read more from Catherine Hours from Phys.org here.

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